Category Archives: News

National Grid in JV to build New York green hydrogen storage, delivery project

Atlantic U.S. utility National Grid is partnering to demonstrate a multi-use renewable hydrogen-based energy storage and delivery system in New York.

The venture with Standard Hydrogen Corp. will focus around developing what National Grid called the first such hydrogen storage and delivery system in New York’s Capital Region. The project is expected to be completed late next year.

The planned system will produce hydrogen from purchased renewable power exclusively. Once stored, it then can be offered for market-based zero-carbon energy services that support electric services, heating, zero emissions vehicles and commercial gas services.

“Green, renewable hydrogen is a key piece of the puzzle to reach net-zero by 2050,” said Badar Khan, president of National US, in a statement. “The new hydrogen-based system is doing to reduce emissions in New York across power, transportation and heating—the three most difficult sectors to decarbonize.”

Green, or carbon-free, hydrogen can be produced from an electrolysis fueled by other zero-carbon energy resources such as utility-scale wind or solar.

Read more of our coverage of hydrogen’s potential role in future power generation

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Standard Hydrogen Corp. will operate the hydrogen production and storage site to reduce potential financial impact on National Grid’s utility customers.

National Grid said the move to hydrogen helps achieve its goal such as reducing greenhouse gas emissions from direct operations 80 percent by 2030, and reduce GHG emissions from the electricity and gas businesses 20 percent by 2030.

The utility provides electric and gas service to customers in New York, Massachusetts and Rhode Island.

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POWERGEN International will return live next January in Dallas. Hydrogen: What’s New, What’s Next? is one of the tracks and seeking presentations to explain the future of H2 in the generation mix. Our call for speakers is now open until May 17. Submit your idea here.

The post National Grid in JV to build New York green hydrogen storage, delivery project appeared first on Renewable Energy World.

Low Energy Sustainable Buildings

In this modern age, we are always looking for ways in which to be more sustainable, there is no denying that. Whether that is eating less meat, recycling more, or using renewable energy in our homes. We only have one planet and even the smallest lifestyle changes can have incredible results on its sustainability. While …

The post Low Energy Sustainable Buildings first appeared on The Renewable Energy Hub.

Amazon’s Latest Venture in Going 100 Percent Renewable by 2025

Amazon, the world’s largest retailer, is no stranger to disruptive technology. The brand built its name by revolutionising e-commerce and defined the smart device movement. But its latest tech venture is in sustainable power. Amazon’s renewable energy investments are reaching new heights. In 2019, Amazon announced that it aims to run entirely on renewables by …

The post Amazon’s Latest Venture in Going 100 Percent Renewable by 2025 first appeared on The Renewable Energy Hub.

Grid Storage R&D Center planned for Pacific Northwest National Lab by 2025

The first phase of planning work is underway on a $75 million research and development center focused on accelerating development and deployment of long-duration, low-cost energy storage.

The U.S. Department of Energy announced the beginning of design and construction of the Grid Storage Launchpad located at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory in Richland, Washington.

The facility will include 30 research laboratories, some of which will be testing chambers capable of assessing prototypes and new grid energy storage technologies under real world grid operating conditions.

“The Grid Storage Launchpad facility will bring together researchers and industry from around the country to modernize and add flexibility to the power grid, advance storage technologies, and boost use of clean energy,” said Secretary of Energy Jennifer M. Granholm. “Deploying new grid technologies means we can get more renewable power on the system, support a growing fleet of electric vehicles, make our grid more reliable and resilient, and secure our clean energy future.”

The GSL will focus on three outcomes to advance grid energy storage development:

  • Collaboration: Bringing DOE, multidisciplinary researchers, and industry together at the facility will lower the barriers to innovation and deployment of grid-scale energy storage.
  • Validation: The facility will enable independent testing of next generation grid energy storage materials and systems under realistic grid operating conditions.
  • Acceleration: From benchtop to systems, the facility will de-risk and speed the development of new technologies by propagating rigorous performance requirements.

During this new phase of development, PNNL will select a design and construction contractor and begin working toward the start of construction, which could begin late this year. The building is expected to be operational and ready for occupancy by 2025.

“It took 40 years to get to the current state of today’s lithium-ion battery technology, but we need to move much faster to develop the long-duration, low-cost batteries needed to meet the significant challenges of decarbonizing the energy system,” said PNNL Director Steven Ashby. “The GSL will speed up the process considerably by doing the work needed to develop and deploy new grid storage technologies.”

The Grid Storage Launchpad will support the DOE’s Energy Storage Grand Challenge announced in January 2020 by then Energy Secretary Dan Brouillette. The Challenge was initiated to help researchers and industry develop domestically manufactured energy storage technologies which can meet U.S. market demands by 2030.

— — — — —

Energy Storage Breakthroughs will be a session track in POWERGEN International happening Jan. 26-28 in Dallas. The POWERGEN Call for Speakers is now open and click here to submit a session idea.

The post Grid Storage R&D Center planned for Pacific Northwest National Lab by 2025 appeared first on Renewable Energy World.

Grid Storage R&D Center planned for Pacific Northwest National Lab by 2025

The first phase of planning work is underway on a $75 million research and development center focused on accelerating development and deployment of long-duration, low-cost energy storage.

The U.S. Department of Energy announced the beginning of design and construction of the Grid Storage Launchpad located at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory in Richland, Washington.

The facility will include 30 research laboratories, some of which will be testing chambers capable of assessing prototypes and new grid energy storage technologies under real world grid operating conditions.

“The Grid Storage Launchpad facility will bring together researchers and industry from around the country to modernize and add flexibility to the power grid, advance storage technologies, and boost use of clean energy,” said Secretary of Energy Jennifer M. Granholm. “Deploying new grid technologies means we can get more renewable power on the system, support a growing fleet of electric vehicles, make our grid more reliable and resilient, and secure our clean energy future.”

The GSL will focus on three outcomes to advance grid energy storage development:

  • Collaboration: Bringing DOE, multidisciplinary researchers, and industry together at the facility will lower the barriers to innovation and deployment of grid-scale energy storage.
  • Validation: The facility will enable independent testing of next generation grid energy storage materials and systems under realistic grid operating conditions.
  • Acceleration: From benchtop to systems, the facility will de-risk and speed the development of new technologies by propagating rigorous performance requirements.

During this new phase of development, PNNL will select a design and construction contractor and begin working toward the start of construction, which could begin late this year. The building is expected to be operational and ready for occupancy by 2025.

“It took 40 years to get to the current state of today’s lithium-ion battery technology, but we need to move much faster to develop the long-duration, low-cost batteries needed to meet the significant challenges of decarbonizing the energy system,” said PNNL Director Steven Ashby. “The GSL will speed up the process considerably by doing the work needed to develop and deploy new grid storage technologies.”

The Grid Storage Launchpad will support the DOE’s Energy Storage Grand Challenge announced in January 2020 by then Energy Secretary Dan Brouillette. The Challenge was initiated to help researchers and industry develop domestically manufactured energy storage technologies which can meet U.S. market demands by 2030.

— — — — —

Energy Storage Breakthroughs will be a session track in POWERGEN International happening Jan. 26-28 in Dallas. The POWERGEN Call for Speakers is now open and click here to submit a session idea.

The post Grid Storage R&D Center planned for Pacific Northwest National Lab by 2025 appeared first on Renewable Energy World.

Global wind industry reached nearly 100 GW of new installed capacity in 2020

According to recent analysis by BloombergNEF, in last year’s record-setting year, the wind market commissioned nearly 100 gigawatts (GW) of new build in 2020. Undeterred by COVID-19, installations grew 59% year-on-year.

Developers commissioned 96.3 GW of wind turbines globally in 2020, compared with 60.7 GW the previous year, said BNEF. Most of these were on land (94%), as the addition of new turbines at sea fell to 6.1 gigawatts – a 19% drop compared to 2019.

Just four manufacturers accounted for more than half (51%) of the machines deployed. General Electric (GE), Vestas, Goldwind and Envision all commissioned over 10 GW last year.

The latest data from BNEF shows that GE and Goldwind were the top two turbine suppliers in 2020, following a surge in installations in the U.S. and China. Vestas, which placed first for the past four years, fell to third place in the 2020 ranking. The figures draw on BNEF’s global database of wind projects and extensive information from the industry.

“GE and Goldwind claimed the top two spots in this year’s ranking by concentrating on the largest markets. This strategy may not be as fruitful in 2021 as subsidies lapse in those areas,” said Isabelle Edwards, wind associate at BloombergNEF and lead author of the 2020 Global Wind Turbine Market Shares report. “Vestas takes on less market risk, with turbines commissioned in 34 countries last year.”

GE earned its spot at the top of the ranking by increasing its onshore installations by 6.6 GW year-on-year, with installations in the U.S. accounting for some 70% of its 13.5 GW global portfolio. China, meanwhile, accounted for 98% of the capacity commissioned by Chinese turbine makers.

BNEF identified 57.8 GW of new wind capacity commissioned in China last year. In the onshore market, this was more than was commissioned by the entire world in 2019. This increased demand for turbines in China allowed smaller domestic turbine makers to fully utilize their idling manufacturing capacity, and gain ground on their foreign competitors in the global ranking.

“Over twenty turbine makers supplied wind turbines to China and many of them were able to double or triple their year-on year installed capacity,” said Leo Wang, Beijing-based wind associate at BNEF. “The expiring onshore and offshore subsidies fuelled the uptick in installations. Following the lapse of onshore feed-in premiums, the market is likely to see demand drop this year.”

The U.S. commissioned 16.5 GW of new wind capacity last year, as developers prepared for a phase-out of the production tax credit. This was 77% more than in 2019 and 2.6 GW higher than the country’s previous record in 2012. GE supplied 57% (9.4 GW) of this new capacity and Vestas’ market share sank to 31% in 2020, even though the Danish turbine maker commissioned a company record of 5.1 GW across 14 U.S. states.

Total onshore wind additions in 2020 were 19.4 GW in the Americas, 12.6 GW in Europe and 863 MW in Africa and the Middle East, while Asia Pacific accounted for 57.3 GW. BNEF’s database registered new wind farms starting full commercial operations in 44 countries.

Siemens Gamesa retained its position as the leader in the offshore wind market. Last year, Siemens Gamesa commissioned 1.91 GW at sea, with 752 MW at the Borssele wind farm in the Netherlands, and a further 539 MW at the East Anglia One project in the U.K., among other sites.

In a bid to reposition itself as a leading turbine supplier to the offshore wind industry, Vestas acquired MHI Vestas Offshore Wind in late 2020. Nevertheless, Siemens Gamesa already tops the offshore wind order books out to 2025. Five turbine makers from China – Shanghai Electric, Mingyang, Envision, Goldwind and CSSC – overtook Vestas, which slipped to seventh place in the offshore wind market.

Figure 1: Top 10 global wind turbine makers, 2020

Source: BloombergNEF.

Figure 2: Top 10 global onshore wind turbine makers, 2020

Source: BloombergNEF.

The post Global wind industry reached nearly 100 GW of new installed capacity in 2020 appeared first on Renewable Energy World.

Global wind industry reached nearly 100 GW of new installed capacity in 2020

According to recent analysis by BloombergNEF, in last year’s record-setting year, the wind market commissioned nearly 100 gigawatts (GW) of new build in 2020. Undeterred by COVID-19, installations grew 59% year-on-year.

Developers commissioned 96.3 GW of wind turbines globally in 2020, compared with 60.7 GW the previous year, said BNEF. Most of these were on land (94%), as the addition of new turbines at sea fell to 6.1 gigawatts – a 19% drop compared to 2019.

Just four manufacturers accounted for more than half (51%) of the machines deployed. General Electric (GE), Vestas, Goldwind and Envision all commissioned over 10 GW last year.

The latest data from BNEF shows that GE and Goldwind were the top two turbine suppliers in 2020, following a surge in installations in the U.S. and China. Vestas, which placed first for the past four years, fell to third place in the 2020 ranking. The figures draw on BNEF’s global database of wind projects and extensive information from the industry.

“GE and Goldwind claimed the top two spots in this year’s ranking by concentrating on the largest markets. This strategy may not be as fruitful in 2021 as subsidies lapse in those areas,” said Isabelle Edwards, wind associate at BloombergNEF and lead author of the 2020 Global Wind Turbine Market Shares report. “Vestas takes on less market risk, with turbines commissioned in 34 countries last year.”

GE earned its spot at the top of the ranking by increasing its onshore installations by 6.6 GW year-on-year, with installations in the U.S. accounting for some 70% of its 13.5 GW global portfolio. China, meanwhile, accounted for 98% of the capacity commissioned by Chinese turbine makers.

BNEF identified 57.8 GW of new wind capacity commissioned in China last year. In the onshore market, this was more than was commissioned by the entire world in 2019. This increased demand for turbines in China allowed smaller domestic turbine makers to fully utilize their idling manufacturing capacity, and gain ground on their foreign competitors in the global ranking.

“Over twenty turbine makers supplied wind turbines to China and many of them were able to double or triple their year-on year installed capacity,” said Leo Wang, Beijing-based wind associate at BNEF. “The expiring onshore and offshore subsidies fuelled the uptick in installations. Following the lapse of onshore feed-in premiums, the market is likely to see demand drop this year.”

The U.S. commissioned 16.5 GW of new wind capacity last year, as developers prepared for a phase-out of the production tax credit. This was 77% more than in 2019 and 2.6 GW higher than the country’s previous record in 2012. GE supplied 57% (9.4 GW) of this new capacity and Vestas’ market share sank to 31% in 2020, even though the Danish turbine maker commissioned a company record of 5.1 GW across 14 U.S. states.

Total onshore wind additions in 2020 were 19.4 GW in the Americas, 12.6 GW in Europe and 863 MW in Africa and the Middle East, while Asia Pacific accounted for 57.3 GW. BNEF’s database registered new wind farms starting full commercial operations in 44 countries.

Siemens Gamesa retained its position as the leader in the offshore wind market. Last year, Siemens Gamesa commissioned 1.91 GW at sea, with 752 MW at the Borssele wind farm in the Netherlands, and a further 539 MW at the East Anglia One project in the U.K., among other sites.

In a bid to reposition itself as a leading turbine supplier to the offshore wind industry, Vestas acquired MHI Vestas Offshore Wind in late 2020. Nevertheless, Siemens Gamesa already tops the offshore wind order books out to 2025. Five turbine makers from China – Shanghai Electric, Mingyang, Envision, Goldwind and CSSC – overtook Vestas, which slipped to seventh place in the offshore wind market.

Figure 1: Top 10 global wind turbine makers, 2020

Source: BloombergNEF.

Figure 2: Top 10 global onshore wind turbine makers, 2020

Source: BloombergNEF.

The post Global wind industry reached nearly 100 GW of new installed capacity in 2020 appeared first on Renewable Energy World.

New energy storage deployment topped record 3,500 MWh in 2020, ESA report shows

Energy storage installation grew nearly 200 percent and totaled an all-time operational record in fourth quarter 2020, according to a new report.

The report released by analytics and research firm Wood MacKenzie and the U.S. Energy Storage Association’s latest U.S. Monitor report indicated that about 2,156 MWh of new energy storage was brought online in the last three months of the year. This breaks the previous quarterly record and is 182 percent higher than 2020’s third quarter, according to the report.

Falling prices and fewer barriers to energy storage deployment are credited with helping the quarterly revival. Front-of-meter storage accounted for four of every five MW deployed in the fourth quarter, according to report.

Residential storage totaled about 90 MW and represented 14 percent of the MW total during the period. Much of that growth was driven by homeowner interest in California, the ESA release says.

Overall for the year, nearly 1,500 MW of capacity and 3,500 MWh in new storage was brought online. The capacity total was 179 percent higher than the previous year’s installations.

“2020 is the first year that advanced energy storage deployments surpassed gigawatt scale—a tremendous milestone on the path to our aspiration of 100 GW by 2030,” said Jason Burwen, U.S. Energy Storage Association Interim CEO. “With continuing storage cost declines and growing policy support and regulatory reform in states and the federal government, energy storage is on an accelerating trajectory to enable a resilient, decarbonized, and affordable electric grid for all.”

The U.S. energy storage market is forecast to add five times more storage—or close to 7,000 MW­—in 2025, according to the ESA.

Front-of-meter installation could account for up to 85 percent of new MW annually, as utilities deploy large-scale projects to help balance out intermittent renewable energy growth. The U.S. installed 3,115 MWh of storage from 2013-2019, a total which was exceeded in 2020 alone, Wood Mackenzie Head of Energy storage Dan Finn-Foley noted in a statement.

“The data truly speaks for itself,” Finn-Foley said. “This is the hallmark of a market beginning to accelerate exponentially, and momentum will only increase over the coming years.”

The world’s largest utility-scale battery storage system, Moss Landing, was brought online earlier this year in Monterey County, California. The 400 MW/1,600 MWh Moss Landing was developed by Texas-based utility owner Vistra Energy and is backed by long-term contracts with Pacific Gas & Electric.

— — — — —

Decarbonization and Energy Storage Breakthroughs are two of the content tracks when POWERGEN International happens live Jan. 26-28, 2022, in Dallas. The POWERGEN Call for Speakers is open for submissions through May 17. Click here to see the tracks and submit a speaking session idea. Presentations which include utility speakers will be given added weight.

The post New energy storage deployment topped record 3,500 MWh in 2020, ESA report shows appeared first on Renewable Energy World.

New energy storage deployment topped record 3,500 MWh in 2020, ESA report shows

Energy storage installation grew nearly 200 percent and totaled an all-time operational record in fourth quarter 2020, according to a new report.

The report released by analytics and research firm Wood MacKenzie and the U.S. Energy Storage Association’s latest U.S. Monitor report indicated that about 2,156 MWh of new energy storage was brought online in the last three months of the year. This breaks the previous quarterly record and is 182 percent higher than 2020’s third quarter, according to the report.

Falling prices and fewer barriers to energy storage deployment are credited with helping the quarterly revival. Front-of-meter storage accounted for four of every five MW deployed in the fourth quarter, according to report.

Residential storage totaled about 90 MW and represented 14 percent of the MW total during the period. Much of that growth was driven by homeowner interest in California, the ESA release says.

Overall for the year, nearly 1,500 MW of capacity and 3,500 MWh in new storage was brought online. The capacity total was 179 percent higher than the previous year’s installations.

“2020 is the first year that advanced energy storage deployments surpassed gigawatt scale—a tremendous milestone on the path to our aspiration of 100 GW by 2030,” said Jason Burwen, U.S. Energy Storage Association Interim CEO. “With continuing storage cost declines and growing policy support and regulatory reform in states and the federal government, energy storage is on an accelerating trajectory to enable a resilient, decarbonized, and affordable electric grid for all.”

The U.S. energy storage market is forecast to add five times more storage—or close to 7,000 MW­—in 2025, according to the ESA.

Front-of-meter installation could account for up to 85 percent of new MW annually, as utilities deploy large-scale projects to help balance out intermittent renewable energy growth. The U.S. installed 3,115 MWh of storage from 2013-2019, a total which was exceeded in 2020 alone, Wood Mackenzie Head of Energy storage Dan Finn-Foley noted in a statement.

“The data truly speaks for itself,” Finn-Foley said. “This is the hallmark of a market beginning to accelerate exponentially, and momentum will only increase over the coming years.”

The world’s largest utility-scale battery storage system, Moss Landing, was brought online earlier this year in Monterey County, California. The 400 MW/1,600 MWh Moss Landing was developed by Texas-based utility owner Vistra Energy and is backed by long-term contracts with Pacific Gas & Electric.

— — — — —

Decarbonization and Energy Storage Breakthroughs are two of the content tracks when POWERGEN International happens live Jan. 26-28, 2022, in Dallas. The POWERGEN Call for Speakers is open for submissions through May 17. Click here to see the tracks and submit a speaking session idea. Presentations which include utility speakers will be given added weight.

The post New energy storage deployment topped record 3,500 MWh in 2020, ESA report shows appeared first on Renewable Energy World.

Red Rocket’s 4-MW Kruisavallei hydropower plant now operating

The 4-MW Kruisvallei hydropower plant reached commercial operations in late February 2021, according to project developer Red Rocket.

Construction of this small hydro plant, on the Ash River between Clarens and Bethlehem in the Free State Province of South Africa, began in March 2019. Kruisvallei Hydro is the third hydropower project procured under South Africa’s Renewable Energy Independent Power Producer’s Procurement Program (REIPPPP) to come online. The project was awarded Preferred Bidder Status under Bid Window 4 of the REIPPPP.

The facility is split into two run-of-river plants that combine to generate about 24 GWh annually through two turbines, providing power for more than 1,900 households. Ash River flows vary from about 15 m3 to 40 m3, depending on the release schedule from the Lesotho Highlands Scheme.

The facility was constructed by the Red Rocket EPC and will be managed, operated and maintained by Red Rocket Asset Management and O&M Companies, respectively. This is the first project within its greater portfolio that was undertaken using the company’s fully-integrated business model. Thus the project was developed, bid under the REIPPPP Round 4, sponsored, built, and will be operated and managed by Red Rocket.

“Building and operating a project of this nature closes the first of many circles for us as a fully-integrated IPP and we celebrate the completion of Kruisvallei, as an example of our capabilities and what we can bring to the market in the future,” said Matteo Brambilla, chief executive officer of Red Rocket.

Facility for Investments in Renewable Small Transactions (FIRST) — a specialized debt fund established to provide simple, accessible and efficient funding for renewable energy projects in South Africa — provided funding of about ZAR235 million (US$15.3 million) to the project, whose total project investment is about ZAR370 million (US$24.1 million). “The Kruisvallei project is a testament to the Red Rocket team who managed to deliver a successful project during uncertain times and a demonstration of the role, and potential, for renewable energy projects in South Africa,” said Greg Ansermino, principal fund manager of FIRST.

H1 Holdings, a black-owned infrastructure investment and development company that participates as a 46.5% shareholder via the project company, Zevobuzz (RF) (Pty) Ltd, also sees growth in its portfolio through the completion of this project, making it an authentic vehicle for empowerment through the power sector in South Africa, according to the release. Reyburn Hendricks of H1 explained that the project assists in achieving its objective of improving the lives of people using the power sector as an access point. “We’re excited to participate in this joint venture, where we will see South Africans receive meaningful improvements to their lives from ownership through to economic, social and development initiatives that we will undertake over the next two decades,” Hendricks said.

Kruisvallei Hydro has committed a percentage of its annual revenues to initiatives in education, housing and sustainable enterprise development initiatives, in areas surrounding, for the life-cycle of the project.

Red Rocket began in 2012 as the Africa and Middle East’s business unit of Building Energy, a global independent power producer. The company provides integrated solutions, from design and development to energy production, operation and maintenance, and asset management in South Africa and beyond.

Red Rocket has 377 MW of plants in operation, under construction or awarded preferred bidder and ready to reach financial close, with $1 billion invested in various projects and a pipeline in excess of 2 GW in wind, hydro and solar developments across the continent.

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